Posts tagged ‘timber wolf’

May 23, 2018

Timber Wolf and Coneflowers

As is so often the case, I cover one painting over with another, neither better or worse … just different.  As an artist who has been painting for a good part of my life of almost 70 years, art has always been a form of experimentation and an exploration of the world and our environment, a search to understand what is seen and sometimes unseen.  The material form of that experiment has never seemed that important once the search has ended and the painting completed; and so’ I have always agreed with the da Vinci on the matter of science in art and art in science.  It all seems related.  He said:

“To develop a complete mind: Study the science of art; Study the art of science. Learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else.”

― Leonardo da Vinci

In my study of the north country of Minnesota and the threat to our wilderness, it was natural that I should want to paint a timber wolf.  Having only seen a wolf in captivity and in photographs of others I felt the need to make one of my own that captured the feelings I have for this endangered species.

I painted one that seemed a bit unrealistic to me and after finishing Timber Wolf and Coneflowers , I decided to paint over it to make my most recent portrait of a Minnesota Timber Wolf.  Forgotten and yet not lost because I had made a digital copy of the first version, I still regret that I had not just started another painting on a separate board.  As I look at these two now, they are both so different in mood and message.  What is better, what is worse?  The journey is better for both to enable us to be better prepared for our next painting, our next chapter.

It’s is only recently that I have begun to realize when to quit one painting and move on to another.  It’s a lesson that we could all learn well in life.

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December 23, 2014

Good news for the wolf …

wolf

… as U.S. District Judge Beryl Howell determines that delisting the wolf was a flawed decision; and has banned further hunting. An additional two hundred and seventy two wolves were killed this season in Minnesota alone, adding to the total lost since 2012 … and so, this decision is a welcome one.

In the week of the winter solstice, as the wolves prepare their dens and will soon be raising young, may you all have a peace-filled holiday season!

http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2014/12/19/great-lakes-wolves-ordered-returned-to-endangered-list/

 

March 18, 2014

Awaiting the vote on HF2680 to reinstate a moratorium on hunting and trapping our Minnesota Wolves

2_wolves_howling_mixed_media

Before doing the necessary studies to determine actual wolf populations, we have now had two wolf hunts in Minnesota.  There is no way to know whether their numbers are threatened without this survey and so the Senate has voted to re-instate a temporary moratorium on the wolf hunt until studies can be done.  There are other proposed changes as well:

http://legiscan.com/MN/text/HF2680/2013

After the 1930’s, the timber wolf was decimated in the lower 48 states leaving only Minnesota with original gray wolf populations, the only outside of Alaska in the United States.  Studies have shown also that populations of healthy wolves are controlled in great part by the diversity of the gene pool, diminishing the birth of pups and reducing the possibility of recovery in places where there is a lack of diversity as in Yellowstone and Isle Royale. The gene pool of wolves here in Minnesota is more diversified, being wild, and therefore priceless in the reestablishment of the species here and elsewhere. At last count we have almost half of the wolves extant in the lower 48.  Those numbers have been diminished greatly by two hunting seasons.

With the threat of copper mining looming if the Polymet is permitted (ROD due this fall and permit process already moving forward) the wolves will not be the only receptors of concern at risk. Protections of these apex predators would be a beginning.

Please contact your representatives and send a letter to Governor Dayton voicing your concern and support for reinstatement of a moratorium on hunting the timber wolf. Your representatives in the house need to hear from you concerning HF 2680.

I am including Senator Scott Dibble’s response on April 13th, 2012 in part, to these concerns below:

“Prior to 1974 when wolves were unprotected in Minnesota, the wolf population fell to below 400.  Since then, after they were added to the federal Endangered Species List and also classified as threatened by the State of Minnesota, their population has grown to somewhere between 2,200 and 3,500.  The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) tells us that absent a hunting and trapping season, the population has been stable since 1998.  Exact numbers are not known, hence the need for more data and better diligence.

… Owners of livestock, guard animals, and domestic animals are already allowed to shoot wolves that pose a threat to their animals.  The state also compensates farmers for livestock lost to wolves.  In 2001, the DNR’s Wolf Management Plan, created with the help of more than two dozen stakeholders, called for a five year moratorium on the taking of wolves following federal delisting from the Endangered Species List.  I will work to see that the DNR’s original plan is implemented so that careful planning will not be pre-empted by this legislative rush to open up a wolf hunt.”

Links:

http://legiscan.com/MN/bill/HF2680/2013

http://theuptake.org/2014/03/03/crying-wolf-activists-demand-end-to-minnesota-wolf-hunt/

http://www.howlingforwolves.org/

http://howlcolorado.org/2010/01/28/the-wolf-vs-deer-controversy/

December 10, 2012

A Case for writ of CERTIORARI in the case of Canis Lupus

If the wolf has grown to such a large “nuisance” population in Minnesota that it must be managed, then why does it take 6000 hunters to bag 400 pelts?
The fact is that the grey wolf’s preferred prey in this state is deer, not man, his stock, or his pets – taking only a fraction of the deer that Minnesota hunters kill each year. As a benefit, wolves contribute to healthier deer populations by taking the weaker animals, while the same cannot be said of man. Ordinarily shy as well, wolves are also territorial and so it is man’s encroachment that causes conflict.
It is crucial for our species to take a broader view concerning the wolf and see how its demise hurts us all. Do we truly believe that these takings are wise in the long term? How is it possible that we have failed to use rational thought to this extent, and allowed this killing to proceed without the necessary studies and, above all, caution? Do we honestly believe, as it would seem, that our species is the only one that has any relevance; and failed to see that access to wild land, clean air and water by other creatures, as well as man, determines a healthier life for all? The wolf’s survival and its access to wilderness, in essence, protects this resource for all.
For thousands of years Native Americans have understood that no one “owned” the land. They were stewards in the most profound sense and, like the wolf, respected nature’s cycles and maintained a balance with nature and its creatures. We could learn from their teachings, their respect and understanding of the inter-connectedness of man’s well-being with that of the wolf as well.
Is one “gullible” to protest when the wolf, without being a problem truly, is murdered, slaughtered, tortured through trapping, or hunted as vermin and for trophies? Since when did the DNR stop protecting our resources to preserve the rights of the few for this taking? The case against this hunt of our native populations of wolves should be taken up and defended for good reason.
Truth be told, the timber wolf of Minnesota is a treasure. It’s delisting off ESL and this hunt should be protested along with other hunts across the country. Canis lupus stands at a fraction of its original numbers worldwide. Fact. Minnesota has a diverse original wild gene pool that is priceless for future propagation. Fact. The size of that population is crucial. Fact. The DNR did not do the proper due diligence to determine its current numbers before allowing the 2012 hunt. Fact.
The wolf is important and beautiful because it is wild, and a prime indicator species that contributes to the health of this environment. Its populations notoriously disappear with the loss of wilderness. Through fear and historical competition with wolves for food, man had developed and has maintained an adversarial relationship. Times and conditions have changed. Shouldn’t we?
The wolf is a sentinel, a guardian of the wild, these diminishing wellsprings of life as crucial to our survival as that of the wolf. As the wolf goes, so goes the wilderness; and to understand why civilization cannot afford this, one need only review the long history of what has gone before – the facts.

Anita Suzanne Tillemans
December 4, 2012

October 26, 2012

Brother Against Brother

Thoughts on the upcoming Minnesota wolf hunt November 2012

How would we treat this planet if we saw wolf as our “brother” and earth as our “mother” ? 

Sigurd F Olson believed that the wolf was an impressive influence in the wilderness and that its removal could change a situation that has been in the making for centuries.   He saw how integrated its well-being was with the well-being of all creatures, and understood that artificial management of the wolf would change the character of the wilderness.defender of the wilderness, advocate of the BWCA and Superior-Quetico

Chief Seattle believed, like Olson, that all things are connected.  He understood, like John Donne, not to ask “for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for thee”… for all of us.  Whatever happens to one essentially happens to all.  How can we continue to contaminate our water, our air, murder our brothers and sisters, destroy the wild places and animals under the guise of “management”, without suffering the consequences of this disrespect?

The North American Indian understood this and respected the earth as “mother”, the wolf as “brother” ….  As we propose to slaughter this creature starting in the upcoming Minnesota deer hunting season with 6000 hunting and trapping licenses for 400 pelts, how could the purpose be any clearer?   We have made the wilderness our battleground – for what?  The wolf will be gone or “managed” into a tame shadow of its true self.  Our wilderness areas will be turned into amusement parks, game farms, and vacation areas for the wealthy or sold to corporate greed for timber and precious metals.  Our children will never know the true wealth and beauty of life-affirming and pristine wilderness.  We will have arrived at the “end of living and the beginning of survival” as Chief Seattle so wisely predicted some 157 years ago.wolf_portrait_drawing

As a friend once asked, “what has become of us when we can’t tell the difference between a national park and a battlefield?”  Battlefields, historic buildings, and monuments to men’s wars are now included as National Parks alongside our park lands.  How can this be reconciled with the original intent of the National Park System to preserve the masterpieces of creation for all time and all people?

If you would like to speak up against the wolf hunt scheduled to begin this November, 2012 in Minnesota, please contact your representatives, the DNR and check out the links below.  Through your understanding and support perhaps we can move in a more rational direction and stop the taking of another priceless treasure, pitting brother against brother.

Anita Suzanne Tillemans

October 26, 2012

http://howlingforwolves.org/dnr-letter?utm_source=Full+List+9-10-12&utm_campaign=76a091a909-wolf-howl-sound&utm_medium=email

http://www.howlingforwolves.org/about-gray-wolf/#mankind

Office of the DNR Commissioner, 500 Lafayette Rd, St Paul, MN 55115 Tom.Landwehr@state.mn.us    651-296-6157

Office of the Governor, 130 State Capitol, 75  Rev Dr Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, St Paul, MN 55155  mark.dayton@state.mn.us   651-201-3400, 1-800-657-3717, Minnesota Relay:800-627-3529Fax: 651-797-1850