Posts tagged ‘Minnesota’

March 26, 2016

Pillsbury’s Best

One of the historic old buildings in what was the flour district in Minneapolis on the Mississippi River …

 

Beside a water tower located in St Anthony Main

Beside a water tower located in St Anthony Main

Advertisements
March 20, 2016

Will a copper mine in Babbitt reach the dimensions of the Hull Rust Mine?

While the MDNR (Minnesota Department of Natural Resources) has approved the NorthMet Copper Mine Project’s environmental impact study in the St Louis County of northern Minnesota at the headwaters of the St Lawrence Seaway and Lake Superior , we wait for permits and the final RODs (record of decisions) from the National Forest Service and the Army Corps of Engineers. 

The project depends on the National Forest Service’s approval of a land exchange … trading public, “protected” lands for private lands so that Polymet can mine.

If Polymet cannot make good on their financial promises for this project (and these are many), then the taxpayers of Minnesota will foot the bill for clean up (a clean up, in all probability, that will go into an unforeseeable future.  Future generations will inevitably suffer the consequences.

For the sake of our waters,

Anita

March 3, 2016

In the wake of our waters …

The DNR has decided that a copper mine will be suitable for northern Minnesota in its ROD (record of decision) for the NorthMet Project by approving the NorthMet Project’s FEIS. Two other agencies, the Forest Service and Army Corps of Engineers decisions will be upcoming.

For more information on this monumental decision, one that will eventually affect waters in the BWCA, the Rainy River watershed as well as the St Louis watershed, into the Great Lakes, as a consequence of hundreds and possibly thousands of years of runoff from copper sulfide mining:

http://www.startribune.com/state-s-long-awaited-decision-on-mine-review-coming-thursday/370925881/

For more information concerning this proposal, on this site:

https://anitatillemans.wordpress.com/2015/12/21/comments-on-the-final-environmental-impact-statement-for-the-northmet-mining-project-and-land-exchange-hoyt-lakes-st-louis-county-minnesota/

https://anitatillemans.wordpress.com/?s=polymet

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

October 18, 2015

Fall in Wisconsin

interstate_park_fall

August 17, 2015

Edina’s Namesake

A mill was built in 1857 at the spot where Minnehaha creek now crosses 50th to take advantage of the turbulence of its waters at the time.  Called Waterville Mill, it was eventually bought by a Scot, Andrew Craik, in 1869 and renamed Edina Mills after his hometown of Edinburgh.

millstone

Edina’s namesake then is this mill, which provided flour during the civil war to the Fort Snelling Reserve. At the time Edina Mills was operating 24 hours a day to supply the Union Army.

Passing through many owners over time, it fell into disuse in the 1890’s particularly once the Gray’s Bay damn was built at the creek’s headwaters in Minnetonka.

Though the building no longer remains,  nor is the creek a source of power that it once was, posts mark the spot where it stood those many years serving as a foundation for the community of Edina.

June 15, 2015

Elimination of the MPCA Citizen’s Board, MN and an arrangement to facilitate pollution of our water ….

One of the best articles explaining the benefits to mining from our Minnesota Special Session in 2015 can be read at:

http://www.virginiamn.com/news/local/range-wins-big-by-not-losing/article_2febff90-1238-11e5-b8d3-f368a5c79072.html

No bias here… just statements concerning the relief expected for the mining industry in the iron range through elimination of the MPCA’S citizen’s board  and an arrangement that will exempt waste from copper nickel mining from solid waste rules.  What better declaration as to the benefits of this board and the protection it has already given to the people who live here?

An essential part of good environmental practice, this board is a protective agency that deals with decisions on pollution of water, air and land resources affecting the entire state.  Since the purpose of this organization is to allow maximum benefit and protection to the welfare of the people in Minnesota, and, since the health of our land, water and air benefits us all, including those on the iron range, a fully functioning board is far from hostile to the citizens of this state.  It should be considered an intelligent part of a program to transition from practices that pollute our base and destroy vital resources.

A link to the MPCA Citizen’s Board page:

http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/about-mpca/mpca-overview/mpca-citizens-board/index.html#overview

January 16, 2015

Lowry Nature Center 2014

Lowry Nature Center

March 18, 2014

Awaiting the vote on HF2680 to reinstate a moratorium on hunting and trapping our Minnesota Wolves

2_wolves_howling_mixed_media

Before doing the necessary studies to determine actual wolf populations, we have now had two wolf hunts in Minnesota.  There is no way to know whether their numbers are threatened without this survey and so the Senate has voted to re-instate a temporary moratorium on the wolf hunt until studies can be done.  There are other proposed changes as well:

http://legiscan.com/MN/text/HF2680/2013

After the 1930’s, the timber wolf was decimated in the lower 48 states leaving only Minnesota with original gray wolf populations, the only outside of Alaska in the United States.  Studies have shown also that populations of healthy wolves are controlled in great part by the diversity of the gene pool, diminishing the birth of pups and reducing the possibility of recovery in places where there is a lack of diversity as in Yellowstone and Isle Royale. The gene pool of wolves here in Minnesota is more diversified, being wild, and therefore priceless in the reestablishment of the species here and elsewhere. At last count we have almost half of the wolves extant in the lower 48.  Those numbers have been diminished greatly by two hunting seasons.

With the threat of copper mining looming if the Polymet is permitted (ROD due this fall and permit process already moving forward) the wolves will not be the only receptors of concern at risk. Protections of these apex predators would be a beginning.

Please contact your representatives and send a letter to Governor Dayton voicing your concern and support for reinstatement of a moratorium on hunting the timber wolf. Your representatives in the house need to hear from you concerning HF 2680.

I am including Senator Scott Dibble’s response on April 13th, 2012 in part, to these concerns below:

“Prior to 1974 when wolves were unprotected in Minnesota, the wolf population fell to below 400.  Since then, after they were added to the federal Endangered Species List and also classified as threatened by the State of Minnesota, their population has grown to somewhere between 2,200 and 3,500.  The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) tells us that absent a hunting and trapping season, the population has been stable since 1998.  Exact numbers are not known, hence the need for more data and better diligence.

… Owners of livestock, guard animals, and domestic animals are already allowed to shoot wolves that pose a threat to their animals.  The state also compensates farmers for livestock lost to wolves.  In 2001, the DNR’s Wolf Management Plan, created with the help of more than two dozen stakeholders, called for a five year moratorium on the taking of wolves following federal delisting from the Endangered Species List.  I will work to see that the DNR’s original plan is implemented so that careful planning will not be pre-empted by this legislative rush to open up a wolf hunt.”

Links:

http://legiscan.com/MN/bill/HF2680/2013

http://theuptake.org/2014/03/03/crying-wolf-activists-demand-end-to-minnesota-wolf-hunt/

http://www.howlingforwolves.org/

http://howlcolorado.org/2010/01/28/the-wolf-vs-deer-controversy/

March 14, 2014

fall in the minnesota arrowhead 2013

golden grass off highway one in st louis county, mn

Off the thoroughfare on my way to Ely, Mn

March 1, 2014

Looking into the Arrowhead from Canada

Canandian Minnesota Border

December 10, 2012

A Case for writ of CERTIORARI in the case of Canis Lupus

If the wolf has grown to such a large “nuisance” population in Minnesota that it must be managed, then why does it take 6000 hunters to bag 400 pelts?
The fact is that the grey wolf’s preferred prey in this state is deer, not man, his stock, or his pets – taking only a fraction of the deer that Minnesota hunters kill each year. As a benefit, wolves contribute to healthier deer populations by taking the weaker animals, while the same cannot be said of man. Ordinarily shy as well, wolves are also territorial and so it is man’s encroachment that causes conflict.
It is crucial for our species to take a broader view concerning the wolf and see how its demise hurts us all. Do we truly believe that these takings are wise in the long term? How is it possible that we have failed to use rational thought to this extent, and allowed this killing to proceed without the necessary studies and, above all, caution? Do we honestly believe, as it would seem, that our species is the only one that has any relevance; and failed to see that access to wild land, clean air and water by other creatures, as well as man, determines a healthier life for all? The wolf’s survival and its access to wilderness, in essence, protects this resource for all.
For thousands of years Native Americans have understood that no one “owned” the land. They were stewards in the most profound sense and, like the wolf, respected nature’s cycles and maintained a balance with nature and its creatures. We could learn from their teachings, their respect and understanding of the inter-connectedness of man’s well-being with that of the wolf as well.
Is one “gullible” to protest when the wolf, without being a problem truly, is murdered, slaughtered, tortured through trapping, or hunted as vermin and for trophies? Since when did the DNR stop protecting our resources to preserve the rights of the few for this taking? The case against this hunt of our native populations of wolves should be taken up and defended for good reason.
Truth be told, the timber wolf of Minnesota is a treasure. It’s delisting off ESL and this hunt should be protested along with other hunts across the country. Canis lupus stands at a fraction of its original numbers worldwide. Fact. Minnesota has a diverse original wild gene pool that is priceless for future propagation. Fact. The size of that population is crucial. Fact. The DNR did not do the proper due diligence to determine its current numbers before allowing the 2012 hunt. Fact.
The wolf is important and beautiful because it is wild, and a prime indicator species that contributes to the health of this environment. Its populations notoriously disappear with the loss of wilderness. Through fear and historical competition with wolves for food, man had developed and has maintained an adversarial relationship. Times and conditions have changed. Shouldn’t we?
The wolf is a sentinel, a guardian of the wild, these diminishing wellsprings of life as crucial to our survival as that of the wolf. As the wolf goes, so goes the wilderness; and to understand why civilization cannot afford this, one need only review the long history of what has gone before – the facts.

Anita Suzanne Tillemans
December 4, 2012

August 13, 2012

Why the rush to delist the wolf throughout this country?

2_wolves_howling_mixed_media

Consider that in Minnesota there have been no reliable studies to determine the numbers of wolves in the area for years.   In effect, the necessary study and a 5-year moratorium on hunting (after delisting) have been essentially bypassed to rush into a hunting season this fall before actual numbers of the timberwolf (grey wolf) have been determined.  What purpose does this serve and why?

Consider that the designation of “endangered species” served as a roadblock to exploitation of mineral resources in Northern Minnesota and that these resources, which (among others) include vast deposits of copper, are in the cross hairs along with the wolf ….  Companies are waiting to dig for these minerals and studies have begun.

Study what copper mining, taconite mining …  have done to other wild places and weep; or better yet, save the wolf at the gate of our northern wilderness in Minnesota by protesting the wrong-headed decision to issue 6000 licenses in 2012 to hunt and trap 400 wolves before we even know how many actually remain.  Will only 400 wolves be taken by 6000 hunters?  How will the DNR ensure this?  How do we know that there are 400 wolves to take … wolves that by the taking will not endanger the entire Minnesota stock?  This is a taking for trophy pelts which will most likely affect the strongest, most beautiful animals, the alpha males who protect and defend the pack.  What does common sense tell us about this kind of hunt where almost every means on the ground will be used to take this creature down?

There is entirely too little time in the rush to hunt the wolf to determine the health of our wolf population, the numbers and the viability of a wolf hunting season this year.

In turn, to discuss the survival of the wolf exclusively without understanding the dynamics at play is shortsighted and does not address the problem … the wolf is not only an apex predator serving to maintain a balance in the wild, it is essentially an important key in the protection of our natural resources and maintenance of a healthy environment.

As it has been said so many times before: Where the wolf goes, so goes the wilderness….

Anita S Tillemans

August 13, 2012

March 28, 2012

A Cry for the Timber Wolf

two_wolves_howling_mixed_media