Posts tagged ‘DNR’

December 10, 2012

A Case for writ of CERTIORARI in the case of Canis Lupus

If the wolf has grown to such a large “nuisance” population in Minnesota that it must be managed, then why does it take 6000 hunters to bag 400 pelts?
The fact is that the grey wolf’s preferred prey in this state is deer, not man, his stock, or his pets – taking only a fraction of the deer that Minnesota hunters kill each year. As a benefit, wolves contribute to healthier deer populations by taking the weaker animals, while the same cannot be said of man. Ordinarily shy as well, wolves are also territorial and so it is man’s encroachment that causes conflict.
It is crucial for our species to take a broader view concerning the wolf and see how its demise hurts us all. Do we truly believe that these takings are wise in the long term? How is it possible that we have failed to use rational thought to this extent, and allowed this killing to proceed without the necessary studies and, above all, caution? Do we honestly believe, as it would seem, that our species is the only one that has any relevance; and failed to see that access to wild land, clean air and water by other creatures, as well as man, determines a healthier life for all? The wolf’s survival and its access to wilderness, in essence, protects this resource for all.
For thousands of years Native Americans have understood that no one “owned” the land. They were stewards in the most profound sense and, like the wolf, respected nature’s cycles and maintained a balance with nature and its creatures. We could learn from their teachings, their respect and understanding of the inter-connectedness of man’s well-being with that of the wolf as well.
Is one “gullible” to protest when the wolf, without being a problem truly, is murdered, slaughtered, tortured through trapping, or hunted as vermin and for trophies? Since when did the DNR stop protecting our resources to preserve the rights of the few for this taking? The case against this hunt of our native populations of wolves should be taken up and defended for good reason.
Truth be told, the timber wolf of Minnesota is a treasure. It’s delisting off ESL and this hunt should be protested along with other hunts across the country. Canis lupus stands at a fraction of its original numbers worldwide. Fact. Minnesota has a diverse original wild gene pool that is priceless for future propagation. Fact. The size of that population is crucial. Fact. The DNR did not do the proper due diligence to determine its current numbers before allowing the 2012 hunt. Fact.
The wolf is important and beautiful because it is wild, and a prime indicator species that contributes to the health of this environment. Its populations notoriously disappear with the loss of wilderness. Through fear and historical competition with wolves for food, man had developed and has maintained an adversarial relationship. Times and conditions have changed. Shouldn’t we?
The wolf is a sentinel, a guardian of the wild, these diminishing wellsprings of life as crucial to our survival as that of the wolf. As the wolf goes, so goes the wilderness; and to understand why civilization cannot afford this, one need only review the long history of what has gone before – the facts.

Anita Suzanne Tillemans
December 4, 2012

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October 26, 2012

Brother Against Brother

Thoughts on the upcoming Minnesota wolf hunt November 2012

How would we treat this planet if we saw wolf as our “brother” and earth as our “mother” ?

Sigurd F Olson believed that the wolf was an impressive influence in the wilderness and that its removal could change a situation that has been in the making for centuries.   He saw how integrated its well-being was with the well-being of all creatures, and understood that artificial management of the wolf would change the character of the wilderness.defender of the wilderness, advocate of the BWCA and Superior-Quetico

Chief Seattle believed, like Olson, that all things are connected.  He understood, like John Donne, not to ask “for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for thee”… for all of us.  Whatever happens to one essentially happens to all.  How can we continue to contaminate our water, our air, murder our brothers and sisters, destroy the wild places and animals under the guise of “management”, without suffering the consequences of this disrespect?

The North American Indian understood this and respected the earth as “mother”, the wolf as “brother” ….  As we propose to slaughter this creature starting in the upcoming Minnesota deer hunting season with 6000 hunting and trapping licenses for 400 pelts, how could the purpose be any clearer?   We have made the wilderness our battleground – for what?  The wolf will be gone or “managed” into a tame shadow of its true self.  Our wilderness areas will be turned into amusement parks, game farms, and vacation areas for the wealthy or sold to corporate greed for timber and precious metals.  Our children will never know the true wealth and beauty of life-affirming and pristine wilderness.  We will have arrived at the “end of living and the beginning of survival” as Chief Seattle so wisely predicted some 157 years ago.wolf_portrait_drawing

As a friend once asked, “what has become of us when we can’t tell the difference between a national park and a battlefield?”  Battlefields, historic buildings, and monuments to men’s wars are now included as National Parks alongside our park lands.  How can this be reconciled with the original intent of the National Park System to preserve the masterpieces of creation for all time and all people?

If you would like to speak up against the wolf hunt scheduled to begin this November, 2012 in Minnesota, please contact your representatives, the DNR and check out the links below.  Through your understanding and support perhaps we can move in a more rational direction and stop the taking of another priceless treasure, pitting brother against brother.

Anita Suzanne Tillemans

October 26, 2012

http://howlingforwolves.org/dnr-letter?utm_source=Full+List+9-10-12&utm_campaign=76a091a909-wolf-howl-sound&utm_medium=email

http://www.howlingforwolves.org/about-gray-wolf/#mankind

Office of the DNR Commissioner, 500 Lafayette Rd, St Paul, MN 55115 Tom.Landwehr@state.mn.us    651-296-6157

Office of the Governor, 130 State Capitol, 75  Rev Dr Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, St Paul, MN 55155  mark.dayton@state.mn.us   651-201-3400, 1-800-657-3717, Minnesota Relay:800-627-3529Fax: 651-797-1850

August 13, 2012

Why the rush to delist the wolf throughout this country?

2_wolves_howling_mixed_media

Consider that in Minnesota there have been no reliable studies to determine the numbers of wolves in the area for years.   In effect, the necessary study and a 5-year moratorium on hunting (after delisting) have been essentially bypassed to rush into a hunting season this fall before actual numbers of the timberwolf (grey wolf) have been determined.  What purpose does this serve and why?

Consider that the designation of “endangered species” served as a roadblock to exploitation of mineral resources in Northern Minnesota and that these resources, which (among others) include vast deposits of copper, are in the cross hairs along with the wolf ….  Companies are waiting to dig for these minerals and studies have begun.

Study what copper mining, taconite mining …  have done to other wild places and weep; or better yet, save the wolf at the gate of our northern wilderness in Minnesota by protesting the wrong-headed decision to issue 6000 licenses in 2012 to hunt and trap 400 wolves before we even know how many actually remain.  Will only 400 wolves be taken by 6000 hunters?  How will the DNR ensure this?  How do we know that there are 400 wolves to take … wolves that by the taking will not endanger the entire Minnesota stock?  This is a taking for trophy pelts which will most likely affect the strongest, most beautiful animals, the alpha males who protect and defend the pack.  What does common sense tell us about this kind of hunt where almost every means on the ground will be used to take this creature down?

There is entirely too little time in the rush to hunt the wolf to determine the health of our wolf population, the numbers and the viability of a wolf hunting season this year.

In turn, to discuss the survival of the wolf exclusively without understanding the dynamics at play is shortsighted and does not address the problem … the wolf is not only an apex predator serving to maintain a balance in the wild, it is essentially an important key in the protection of our natural resources and maintenance of a healthy environment.

As it has been said so many times before: Where the wolf goes, so goes the wilderness….

Anita S Tillemans

August 13, 2012