About

Loon Lake / oak tree / anita / photo

As I have been all my life, in a query about the working of the world through art, writing, studies, observations … wondering just how far we will go, how far we can go in our quest to develop past a state of survival.  With ever increasing populations and an insatiable desire to dominate the natural world out of fear, we seem destined to repeat the same mistakes … destroying the very thing that sustains us and nurtures us.

Will we continue to foul our water and air and destroy our canopy? Will we curb our population growth with respect so that we can sustain a life worth living for all species on this planet, through planning and wise management?   What is life without the beauty that comes with diversity?  What is life without kindness?  What is life without truth? What is life when it comes so cheap with no respect?  Will we eventually move toward stewardship not dominion?  Sometimes I question whether we have any choice in our lives but the attitude we choose.

Life is a bed of roses, truly, but with thorns; and so it seems that the appreciation of beauty is, not only, as Thoreau believed, a “moral test” but essential to life.  We all have trials, moments where the corruption in our justice system, political and social systems, or injustices and misfortunes on a more personal level seem to far outweigh the good in life … tests that promote a sort of pessimism and a cynicism that keeps us from appreciating the good that comes our way in each passing moment.

Anita S. TILLEMANS, Relator, v. PIERCE COMPANY OF MINNEAPOLIS, INC., and Mutual Insurance Corporation, n/k/a APCapitol, Respondents

(The above case was fought four long years and I include my comments at the above link.)

I truly believe that it is wise to find joy, no matter what may come your way; and that the greatest joys are shared.  It seems also true that beauty as it is, in the eye of the beholder, comes in many guises and needs an open mind and eyes wide open to see … like truth.

May you find beauty in every day.

anitasartwork

Gallery at Mn Artists

A Case for Justice

What harm could mining do in the watershed of the BWCA and headwaters of the Mississippi River?

In light of the ongoing process to permit the Polymet to mine copper in Babbitt with a processing center in Hoyt Lakes, I am reposting my article first published in November, 2012:

A view of Northern Minnesota as the battle rages for copper, sulfide mining near the Boundary Waters Wilderness Area.

 

What is the difference at the heart of any religion, when truth and kindness reign?

Kindness and truth are at the heart of all religions and so Christians are not alone on these matters.
Quotations from the Muslim Prophet Muhammad:

On kindness:
Kindness is a mark of faith, and whoever has not kindness has not faith.
None of you truly believes until he wishes for his brother what he wishes for himself.
He who helpeth his fellow-creature in the hour of need, and he who helpeth the oppressed, him will God help in the Day of Travail.
They will enter the Garden of Bliss who have a true, pure, and merciful heart.

On riches:
It is difficult for a man laden with riches to climb the steep path which leads to bliss.
O Lord Keep me alive a poor man, and let me die poor and raise me amongst the poor.
Seek for my satisfaction in that of the poor and needy.

On truth (heaven, self-knowledge):
Heaven lieth at the feet of mothers.
He who knoweth his own self, knoweth God.
Learn to know thyself.

Success?

anita_northwoods_hike
Where will the quiet places be found, the wilderness areas that sustain all life if we, as a society, continue to place money above all else?

Understanding the true meaning of success was a journey through a maze of propaganda and a lifetime of searching for the truth.  I searched in the first place because I understood viscerally that propaganda was leading me in the wrong direction.  It did not make me happy to follow these trails.  I did not find true wealth in money and material things. Truth for me was found in the humanity of a smile, the beauty of a sunset, the warmth of firelight … and so I found that success in my life was inextricably linked to beauty, and that knowledge of this truth was the only thing that could bring me the happiness so important for it realization.  It required me to reach outside of myself into a larger landscape to fulfill the admonition:

“Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

Jesus of Nazareth

Truth and kindness, then, made its way into my formula for success.  Suited to every individual bar none; and the difficulty lies within ourselves, our own ability to see beyond the mundane sphere of our lives to the greater world around us, in order to know true success.

What would this planet be like if we took it upon ourselves to make this our life’s mission; and if we understood that whatsoever we do to the most humble of us we do to ourselves?

It does not mean going out of our way to do good for others. Leave someone alone, if need be.  Show respect as you would have it … a simple smile or a greeting.  What would you want?  What would you expect if you were in their place?  This kind of success knows no boundaries and no static definition.  It is defined by the people who live it.

For a better world.

 

Recycling

On a walk through one of our parks a few years back, I noticed this growth on the trunk of a tree … a fairly reliable sign that the tree was dying.  New growth from old on a day in October.  It seemed poetic in all the splendor of that fall day.

http://treesforlife.org.uk/forest/forest-ecology/fungi-95/

http://vanessavobis.com/2009/04/maine-tree-fungus/

https://www.thetreecenter.com/common-tree-fungus/

What does wealth mean to you?

 

I had long ago decided to be happy … but got distracted along the way by so many things that occurred to cloud the issue, the issue of living honestly and with integrity … finding joy as a child would, naturally.

One cannot be happy without this and there is no wealth without it either.  Where do you find your joy?

To be satisfied with what one has; that is wealth.  As long as one sorely needs a certain additional amount, that man isn’t rich.

Mark Twain

An Open Letter to Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton

Dear Governor Dayton,

The headwaters of the Mississippi, the Rainy River and the Great Lakes, as we know, originate in northern Minnesota extending through the heartland of this country to the Gulf, the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean and the Rainy River to Hudson Bay; and, so, water knows no boundaries, especially those drawn on a map.  It permeates all of life.  It is our base.  Words will not change the truth that we, as Minnesota citizens, have a responsibility, not only to ourselves but to the entire biosphere, now and into the future, to preserve this vital, rare and important aquifer that is Minnesota.

I have watched the prescient actions of your office involving our water legacy … the studies and the foresight to do things that have been lacking for too long.  For over one hundred years, the state of Minnesota has condoned mining in the Laurentian Divide and for one hundred years, the Mississippi has suffered all the way to the Gulf of Mexico.  The Great Lakes, too, have seen damage. The waters of the St Louis River are imperiled because of mining.  Even the Rainy River watershed has not escaped mining pollution.  Elevated levels of lead and mercury … not including acid rain from coal-fired plants that support mining operations, smelters and other correlated equipment have done their part to imperil this once pristine aquifer and landscape, where the great inland freshwater sea of Lake Agassiz drained its cache.

In spite of this over one-hundred year history of mining in Minnesota, the mention of damage done by one of the river’s greatest polluting industries is rarely mentioned, if at all, in regard to the resulting pollution downstream.  In fact, the Environmental Impact study done on the NorthMet Project for Polymet was done using computer simulations … as if there were hardly any field studies at hand.

I hear that Polymet will “create jobs”.  I hear that the XL Pipeline and the Dakota Access Pipeline will create jobs too … the failsafe claim of these polluters.  How much better to create jobs that sustain the environment rather than destroy?  What better than to change the framing of this picture?  Desperate measures to sustain an industry that will destroy these vital water reserves, in an ecology that has no precedent on Earth, will serve no one in the long term.

By allowing mining of the precious waters of northern Minnesota, we endanger a vital resource for the entire planet.  Mineral leases in the watershed of the Rainy River will ensure damage to the Quetico, the lands surrounding the Superior National Forest and the BWCAW.  Granting Polymet the right to mine and process the waste in Babbitt and in Hoyt Lakes will be a grant to mine, not only copper, but water.  The pollution will find its way into the deep reserves of the area, to the Great Lakes and possibly into the BWCAW, as it will set precedent for further mining of the sort.

Can we excuse this for any number of jobs, jobs that will be here today and gone tomorrow?  Neither you nor I, Governor Dayton, will be here when our children and grandchildren have to answer for the decisions we make today. We will not see a clean-up of these waters … for there is no clean-up possible once copper mining begins.  It took 10,000 years, or more, for the pristine, glacial waters of Agassiz to permeate this precious aquifer.  There is no knowing the extent to which it could be damaged by copper sulfide mining.

No one person can make the necessary changes in toto.   These must be made by all of us changing the way we work and play, the choices we make.  As Governor of Minnesota you have a mandate above and beyond that of a resource manager as you so aptly prove.  You are the designated caretaker of this important aquifer, duly elected by the people of Minnesota and that role cannot be overstated.  Your water initiatives and the two summits give hope.  It would be well that the Minnesota legislature works with you to accomplish this very important work.

Sincerely,

Anita Suzanne Tillemans

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

aquifers surrounding the Babbitt area where Poymet wants to build a copper mine
aquifers surrounding the Babbitt area where Poymet wants to build a copper mine

Forest Service Reneges on its responsibility to protect our waters in lands entrusted to their care …

As of this past week the Forest Service of the United States has issued a decision agreeing to the land exchanges that Polymet will need to mine copper in lands that the USFS had been tasked to protect, at the headwaters of the Great Lakes and water ways on the border of the BWCAW.  I am including a link below to this monumental decision, which, in effect, betrays the public trust giving public lands in the exchange for the private interests of a multi-national corporation.

Forest Service’s ROD on Land Exchange

The process will require permits allowing degradation of air and water quality and another comment period.  It will also, at times, require Polymet to get a permit to take endangered species.  One reason that the  timber wolf may have been taken off of the “endangered species” list, among other equally expedient reasons.

I include links to the status of some of these required permits:

Status and submissions for Polymet’s air quality permit (NorthMet Project)

Status and submissions for Polymet’s water quality permit (NorthMet Project)

Status and submissions for Polymet’s request for 401 certification (NorthMet Project)

How did this prospect ever get a start?

Flying Free?

Mixed Media Photos: This snowy was taken at the Minnesota Zoo and photoshop’d into other backgrounds taken earlier.  It’s easy to see the rough outline in flight of the first.  Took more time on the second.  Fun.

Many years back, in winter, I had seen one land on a streetlight during my break. From the distance, he looked like a huge white gull; and it wasn’t until I had driven closer that I knew better.  Not a sight one sees very often around Minneapolis … and so I hadn’t been prepared.

The size at perch and in flight, so different.  Same for the bald eagle, which seems quite a bit smaller until it spreads those magnificent wings.