AMENDMENT V: No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

Is our criminal and civil justice system standing true to the intent and meaning of the fifth amendment?

Consider that it did not discriminate between citizen and non-citizen, immigrant and undocumented immigrant, nor did it dilineate race or creed, male or female, young or old.

Though our forefathers were imperfect, white, privileged, male and of a time and mind that swayed their preferences, they wrote the cornerstone of our democracy and the Constitution of the United States in our Bill  of Rights. It stands to reason then that for the foundation of this democracy to continue to sanctify our rights, we must be involved at all levels, levels that work naturally for each of us in individual ways that are accepting and real, inclusive and life-affirming.

As Washington wrote:

Vindicate our rights with firmness  and cultivate peace with  sincerity.

We may not agree with others, but it is another’s actions or ideas that are debatable, not their personage, not their rights to disagree or be true to themselves in ways that are also non-violent.  Respect in all  scenarios is essential for peace and understanding, so that we can move to vindicate rights for all.

In order to affirm these rights for one, they must be affirmed for all or this cannot be called, in truth, a democracy.