What is love?

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Those who love know the courage it takes … that love is full of pain as well as joy, but they would not live without it.

Love has been so misunderstood, the word used without much real meaning or depth, maligned and misused.

In my search to understand the disparity, I found that Albert Einstein had listed three ideals that “lighted his way”.  These were truth, beauty and kindness.  In his magnificent way of simplifying this beautiful universe, he gave substance to the word love.  Even as he, the mathematician, felt he had failed at finding a unifying principle in physics, it was at the heart of his life’s journey.

Quotes by Albert Einstein:

“When we survey our lives and endeavors we soon observe that almost the whole of our actions and desires are bound up with the existence of other human beings. We see that our whole nature resembles that of the social animals. We eat food that others have grown, wear clothes that others have made, live in houses that others have built. The greater part of our knowledge and beliefs has been communicated to us by other people through the medium of a language which others have created. Without language our mental capacities would be poor indeed, comparable to those of the higher animals; we have, therefore, to admit that we owe our principal advantage over the beasts to the fact of living in human society. The individual, if left alone from birth would remain primitive and beast-like in his thoughts and feelings to a degree that we can hardly conceive. The individual is what he is and has the significance that he has not so much in virtue of his individuality, but rather as a member of a great human society, which directs his material and spiritual existence from the cradle to the grave.”

“I have never looked upon ease and happiness as ends in themselves — this critical basis I call the ideal of a pigsty. The ideals that have lighted my way, and time after time have given me new courage to face life cheerfully, have been Kindness, Beauty, and Truth. Without the sense of kinship with men of like mind, without the occupation with the objective world, the eternally unattainable in the field of art and scientific endeavors, life would have seemed empty to me. The trite objects of human efforts — possessions, outward success, luxury — have always seemed to me contemptible.”

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